Rules of Style According to Shuhei Nishiguchi

What you can learn from the BEAMS fashion director

Even if you didn’t know his name before reading this post, if you’re a fan of exceptional men’s style and have an Instagram account, you’ve likely seen Shuhei Nishigushi, fashion director at the Japanese brand BEAMS, pop up in your feed.

Shuhei’s style is classic but contemporary, refined but expertly disheveled and a perfect mix of high, low, modern and vintage. If that sounds pretty close to perfect, it’s because we think it is – at least if you’re going by the HSS playbook.

Scrolling through Shuhei’s Instagram feed, you’re likely to ask yourself, “How on earth does he kill it so consistently day in and day out?” And we wouldn’t blame you.

Here are some great takeaways from Shuhei’s style.

Rule No. 1:

High/low. Shuhei is extremely adept at mixing dressy and casual elements. It’s a way to distinguish yourself from the crowd and not simply be “off the rack”.

Rule No. 2:

Double-breasted jackets are often seen as being on the dressier end of the style spectrum. At HSS, we think differently. It’s another form of high/low that Shuhei constantly gives us a masterclass on. A cotton DB with a denim shirt only reinforces how perfectly casually dapper it can look.

Rule No. 3:

While blue and grey will always be your quintessential menswear colors, earth tones – particularly brown – look even more sophisticated, elegant and rich.

Rule No. 4:

Casually tailored. Enough said. Notice the aptly-placed ascot.

Rule No. 5:

One of Shuhei’s signature style moves is the off-center tie on belted outerwear. Remember, there is more than one way to belt a trench. This is a great example of how taking a risk and trying something outside the box can result in an affectation that becomes your own.

Rule No. 6:

The layered denim jacket. Casual is often confused with overly simple. Here, Shuhei demonstrates how to take casual to the next level with one of our favorite layering pieces.

Rule No. 7:

One of the most underestimated parts of a suit, a waistcoat makes a great layering piece and adds a great deal of depth and texture to any outfit.

Rule No. 8:

A great example of someone showing you he knows “the rules” even though he breaks them all the damn time.

Rule No. 9:

Power monochromatic. Always a great way to make a statement without being loud. Notice the infusion of pattern in Shuhei’s coat and the detailing in his trousers.

Rule No. 10:

Elevated off-duty. A great way to spruce up a casual weekend look. Just add a knit cardigan and 3/4 length coat.

Rule No. 11:

The Canadian tuxedo is often the subject of mockery, but here, Shuhei shows us how to change the conversation. Dark toned denim in place of the regular blue and accent with cream offers a fresh take. It seems so simple yet it takes someone with immense creativity to make it a reality you couldn’t imagine didn’t exist before.

Thanks for reading.

Stylishly Yours,

Brian Sacawa
He Spoke Style

Chime In

  • https://www.instagram.com/gsihiller/ gsihiller

    Great article and man, he is just on a different level! I think especially his trouser game is always on point. The ones he is wearing in the monochromatic look are just pure perfection!

    • http://hespokestyle.com/ Brian Sacawa

      Yes, definitely seeing that style creeping in more and more. Higher waist and pleats. As long as it’s not overdone or too affected, I think it can be a good look. It’s also very comfortable.

  • http://www.vipbachelorclub.com W. ADAM MANDELBAUM

    Nice threads, but he doesn’t seem to master the inseam, unless his trousers are for wading through the muddy water of the fashion world.

    • http://hespokestyle.com/ Brian Sacawa

      Higher than I’d wear them as well, but it works for him.

  • http://gentlemanwithin.com Khoi | Gentleman Within

    So many elements of good style here. Classic and modern at the same time. I’m particularly interested in the high/low approach these days. Thanks for the inspiration.

    • http://hespokestyle.com/ Brian Sacawa

      Any time, Khoi! Appreciate the comment and the support. Cheers.

  • Anaxagoras

    I always thought tying a trench coat in that fashion was only for photographing so the underlying garments could be seen. To wear it that way on purpose strikes me as a rather pretentious.