At the Shows: 5 Trends to Wear Now

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Joseph Abboud

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Classic looks at Joseph Abboud.

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Neutrals, scarves and hats at Joseph Abboud. We can get behind that.

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Subtle patterns at Joseph Abboud.

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Advanced layering at Joseph Abboud.

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Yes, please. At Joseph Abboud.

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Pops of color and pattern at Nautica.

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Casual and classic americana at Nautica.

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Creative sweater layering at Nautica.

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Streetwise swagger and sophisticated silhouettes at Public School.

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Monochromatic. Public School.

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High/low at Public School.

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Perry Ellis.

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Monochromatic looks at Perry Ellis.

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Bold monochrome. Perry Ellis.

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Siki Im.

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Details from Zachary Prell.

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Closing night at Todd Snyder.

If we can be obvious for a second, we’d like to state, for the record, a well-known fact: menswear is having a global moment. And it’s a wonderful thing. For the style-conscious among us – and that’s likely everyone reading this site – it’s vindication. And for those who are just beginning their menswear journey, it should be empowering.

One of the effects of the burgeoning global menswear movement is the attention being paid to men’s runway shows, especially the recent addition of a standalone New York Fashion Week dedicated to menswear.

If you’re baffled by fashion shows and feel there’s a bit of a disconnect between the runway and reality, you’re not alone. Yes, some are quite theatrical with looks not necessarily to be worn “in the wild,” but they do serve a purpose. And that purpose is to present the direction of the upcoming season based on forecasted trends.

Yes, trends can be cringe-worthy, but don’t assume ‘trend’ is a dirty word. We were at the shows last week and identified several of the trends you’ll actually want to pay attention to and work into your personal style.

So here are five trends that you can easily wear now (and look forward to wearing next fall).

Monochromatic

mens trends new york fashion week 2016 joseph abboud

| NET NEUTRALITY | Monochromatic looks were all over the runway this season. Above, neutrals at Joseph Abboud. | PHOTOGRAPHY | by Robin West

Though color coordination can seem a bit intimidating at first, there is something elevated and luxe about wearing a head-to-toe look built with pieces in a similar hue. Don’t worry about matching colors exactly – and actually, this is something to be discouraged.

If you’re going to try the monochromatic look, pick a shade (light heathered grey, dark charcoal, navy, chocolate browns, dark red) and find similar shades in different textures or fabric. The subtle differences in the thread and finish will allow the outfit to appear perfectly imperfect.

Turtlenecks

mens trends new york fashion week 2016 todd snyder

| HERE TO STAY | Turtlenecks are making a serious play to join the ranks of the crew neck, v-neck and cardigan as a staple of the sweater world. Above, at Todd Snyder.

We’ve been preaching the utility of the turtleneck for a couple of years now, and it looks like they’re not going anywhere. Turtlenecks of the chunky woven variety, looser fits, and even under two- and three-piece suits, all made a very strong showing.

A turtleneck is a very easy piece to start practicing layering techniques with. It’s simple, stylish and always looks sophisticated. Ideally, you’ll have two in your wardrobe – one in a lightweight merino wool and another that’s a bit more chunky.

Textures & Prints

mens trends new york fashion week 2016 zachary prell

mens trends new york fashion week 2016 perry ellis

| ABOVE & BELOW | Top, a richly textured sweater (and monochromatic look) at Zachary Prell. Bottom, prints at Perry Ellis.

Whether it was shown through the simple knit detailing of a sweater at Zachary Prell, a jacquard suit at Perry Ellis, or a subtle plaid wool print at Public School, the attention paid to details was not overlooked – and it was exactly what we were hoping for.

This round of shows paid respect to the subtle nuances and craftsmanship that the American menswear market has grown accustomed to, and that it deserves.

Layering

mens trends new york fashion week 2016 joseph abboud

| ATTENTION TO DETAIL | Layering well takes some thought and planning, which, when it comes to style, is always a good use of brain power. Above, a favorite look from Joseph Abboud.

We’ve become accustomed to various layering techniques in both menswear and womenswear, but the Joseph Abboud runway was full of many new variations. It also was the first time we’ve seen silk neckwear layered under turtlenecks. A scarf under a turtleneck, under a waist-coat, under an overcoat – the turducken of menswear?

While the looks from Joseph Abboud are admittedly a bit hard (not to mention warm) to manage in your everyday style, the aesthetic seen here and at Public School, Perry Ellis and Todd Snyder can easily be translated from the runway to every day.

Similar to the monochromatic trend, the outfit in the photo above works because of the similar colors that bring the look together.

Rich Colors

mens trends new york fashion week 2016 todd snyder

| GET RICH QUICK | A pop of color needn’t be jarring. Deeper, richer hues present a more luxe and sophisticated appearance. Above, details from Todd Snyder.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: there’s nothing sharper in the fall or winter than the addition of some rich jewel tones.

The slideshow above is filled with luxe greens, blues, reds and golden yellows – all great additions that will add a pop of color to any of the colors on the classic menswear palate. If you’re a bit color-shy, look to your accessories to play around with color, to start.

Assignment: review the slideshow, then chime in below with your thoughts on the trends from this season’s shows.

Stylishly Yours,

Robin West
He Spoke Style

Chime In

  • Rich Tyson

    I love the layered looks and see how they work in larger cities each time an in one. Though in my town of Rochester NY, where one can run the 10 ft from their house to the car and 20 ft from the car into anywhere one wants to go, I feel it isn’t needed as much. Am I wrong?

    • Robin West

      Right. You probably don’t need an abundance of layers for the warmth factor, but the sentiment of it can be translated into a more “everyday” look. Brian has created many great options that are more about aesthetic, like this one: http://hespokestyle.com/wearing-an-ascot/